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#AIDS2016 HIV in Key Populations Twitter Chat

29 June, 2016
10:00 a.m. EDT — 4:00 p.m. CEST

Social Media Kit


Background

HIV does not discriminate, but its impact has been felt more heavily in key populations, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, trans people and people who inject drugs. UNAIDS estimates that between 40% and 50% of all new HIV infections among adults worldwide occur among these key populations and their partners, due to a combination of social and biological factors. Despite some policy gains and increased global attention, key populations still face stigma, discrimination and criminalization –  human rights challenges that impede access to prevention and treatment, furthering the spread of HIV in these communities.

The next #AIDS2016 Twitter chat will focus on the heavy burden of HIV among key populations, and how HIV programmes can respond to their unique needs. Taking place a few short weeks before the start of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016), this digital event will invite participants from around the world to start a conversation about “Access Equity Rights Now” for key populations; a conversation that we will carry forward into AIDS 2016 in Durban, South Africa.

Event Hashtag:

#AIDS2016

Important links:

  • AIDS 2016 Hub: http://bit.ly/AIDS2016Hub

More coming soon!

Host Handles:

  • @AIDS_conference – AIDS 2016
  • @fhi360 – FHI 360
  • @iasociety – International AIDS Society
  • @CCO_HIV – Clinical Care Options
  • @guardianGDP – The Guardian Global Development Professionals Network
  • @aidsmap – NAM

Suggested promo tweets:

  • Join the #AIDS2016 Twitter chat on addressing HIV among key populations: 29 June at 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CET http://bit.ly/AIDS2016Hub
  • Up to 50% of new #HIV infections are among key populations. Let’s chat about causes and solutions. #AIDS2016 [IMAGE]
  • Should HIV programmes focus on everybody or key populations? Join the #AIDS2016 Twitter chat on 29 June at 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CET.
  • #AIDS2016 Twitter chat on gay/bi men, trans women, people who use drugs, other key populations affected by HIV [IMAGE]
  • Join next #AIDS2016 Twitter chat on 29 June, 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CET with @fhi360 and @AIDS_conference to discuss key populations and HIV.
  • Why are some key populations disproportionately affected by HIV? Join the next #AIDS2016 Twitter chat 29 June at 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CET.
  • How should HIV programmes be tailored for key populations at risk? Join the next #AIDS2016 Twitter chat. [IMAGE]
  • Social factors put key populations at greater risk for HIV. Join #AIDS2016 Twitter chat to share solutions. [IMAGE]
  • What role does human rights play in the HIV response among key populations? Join the #AIDS2016 Twitter chat [IMAGE]
  • #AIDS2016 is about Access Equity Rights Now. How can we achieve this for key populations? Join the Twitter chat [IMAGE]

Suggested promo Facebook posts:

  • HIV does not discriminate, but its impact has been felt more heavily in key populations, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, trans people and people who use drugs. Join us for our next Twitter chat on 29 June at 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CEST to start a global conversation on key populations as we gear up for #AIDS2016: Access Equity Rights Now.
  • UNAIDS estimates that between 40% and 50% of all new HIV infections among adults worldwide occur among key populations: gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, trans people and people who use drugs. How can HIV programmes address the social and biological factors that put some groups at greater risk of infection? Join our next #AIDS2016 Twitter chat on 29 June at 10 a.m. EDT/4 p.m. CEST. to discuss Access Equity Rights Now for key populations.

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AIDS2016 Twitter chat shareable image

Draft Questions:

  • Q1: How do you define a “key population” as it relates to HIV? #AIDS2016
  • Q2: 40-50% of all new #HIV infections among adults occur among key populations. What makes some groups more vulnerable to HIV? #AIDS2016
  • Q3: Do HIV programmes need to be tailored for key populations like MSM, trans people, people who inject drugs, sex workers? Why? #AIDS2016
  • Q4: What is a practical example of taking a different approach to HIV prevention, testing or treatment within a key population? #AIDS2016
  • Q5: What role does policy play in the spread of HIV among key populations? How can this be remedied? #AIDS2016
  • Q6: What kinds of barriers prevent members of key populations from accessing HIV services? #AIDS2016
  • Q7: Should HIV services be delivered to everyone equally, or should they be targeted to key populations at risk? #AIDS2016
  • Q8: What does “meaningful engagement” look like in the context of HIV programmes for key populations? #AIDS2016
  • Q9: How can HIV programmes incorporate human rights for key populations into their work? #AIDS2016
  • Q10: What is an example of a programme that has effectively reached a key population at risk for HIV? #AIDS2016

Contact:

Kelley Lennon
FHI 360
klennon@fhi360.org

Andrew Brett
International AIDS Society
andrew.brett@iasociety.org